GWIE | Gradute Writing Institute for Excellence

[  Workshops Descriptions  ]


PEGS’ GWIE presents collaborative and interactive workshops on a variety of academic topics. All workshops include activities and exercises designed to provide students multiple opportunities to acquire, develop, and enhance the skills and corresponding skill-sets associated with graduate-level reading, writing, and research.



  • “Prewriting: Invention strategies…”

    • Description: This workshop will discuss strategies for generating and organizing ideas to make the composition process more efficient and the final product more powerful.

    • Key Terms/Concepts/Strategies: organizational patterns (chronological. logical, climactic, spatial, etc.), reading for gaps, and invention activities (freewriting, clustering, listing, outlining, etc.)

  • “Drafting and Revision: Opening and Closing Papers…”

    • Description: This workshop will model strong introductory and conclusive paragraphs while treating writing as a recursive process rather than as a linear, one-off activity, differentiating between revision and proofreading, and discussing strategies for streamlining the writing process to save writers time and help writers produce stronger work.

    • Key Terms/Concepts/Strategies: Revision vs. Proofreading (saving mechanics until last); recursivity, rhetorical writing (considering the audience), and framing (e.g. framing debates and arguments).

  • “Drafting and Revision: Deepening and Enriching Papers…”

    • Description: This workshop will model successful body paragraphing and discuss strategies for enhancing the analytical power of written work.

    • Key Terms/Concepts/Strategies: paragraph structure (structure within structure—templates), incorporating other voices, the modes of persuasion (ethos, pathos, logos), and explication v. explanation.

  • “Proofreading: Style…”

    • Description: This workshop will show writers how to ease their reader’s passage through their work by modeling clear and simple (elegant) prose, fluid organizational patterns and thematics, and stylistic conventions that signal the writer’s authority.

    • Key Terms/Concepts/Strategies: ethos, concision v. wordiness, clarity (passive voice, action v. linking verbs, and nominalization), and flow (consistent characters, punch lines, and thematics—deep structure).

  • “Proofreading: Mechanics”

    • Description: This workshop will act as a grammar and punctuation refresher and situate grammar and punctuation within the writing process as distinct from drafting and revision with the goal of freeing up work flow and ensuring that finished work evinces the polish and sheen that it should at the graduate level.

    • Key Terms/Concepts/Strategies: the four sentence patterns (simple, compound, complex, and compound-complex), comma splice, run-on, subject/verb agreement, and pronoun/antecedent agreement.

  • “The Deepening Page…”

    • Description: This workshop will help participants to better appreciate scholarly/persuasive writing as an art by modeling the discernment and production of writerly effects intended to appeal to the reader’s emotions, opinion of the writer, and high regard for clear statements and factual support structures.

    • Key Terms/Concepts/Strategies: the rhetorical triangle (ethos, pathos, logos), audience, rhetorical effects (tone, style, voice, etc.)

  • “Advanced Research”

    • Description: This workshop will provide helpful tips and hints (as well as cautionary tales) from experienced graduate students intended to help participants to streamline and invigorate their research process.

    • Key Terms/Concepts/Strategies: using source bibliographies and indexes to find better sources, and maintaining a working annotated bibliography throughout the research process.

  • “Summary/Literature Review”

    • Description: This workshop will address the difficult but important tasks of accurately representing and critically responding to the work of other scholars.

    • Key Terms/Concepts/Strategies: reportage, reading for gaps, and ethics

  • “Writing for the Sciences”

    • Description: In this workshop we will study models of scientific writing from the “hard” and “soft” sciences, looking for and comparing stylistic and structural idioms form various disciplines in order to better reproduce them.

    • Key Terms/Concepts/Strategies: passive voice, presenting data, and objectivity.

  • “Assessing Sources”

    • Description: This workshop will help participants further develop their critical lens by discussing and looking at examples of bias and picking out the assumptions inherent to theoretical writing.

    • Key Terms/Concepts/Strategies: identifying assumptions, becoming sensitive to bias, and generally looking “behind the curtain” for the puppet strings authors manipulate to make their case.